Saudi Prince Likely to Survive Worst Crisis Yet — AP Analysis

Saudi Prince Likely to Survive Worst Crisis Yet — AP Analysis

The killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul is unlikely to halt Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's rise to power, but could cause irreparable harm to relations with Western governments and businesses, potentially endangering his ambitious reform plans.

Mr. Khashoggi, a US resident who fled Saudi Arabia past year, was an outspoken critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Statements from the agency said both the king and the crown prince expressed their condolences for Khashoggi's death.

Saudi Arabia on Monday said Khashoggi's death at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul was a "huge and grave mistake" - after earlier denying for two weeks that the 59-year-old Washington Post journalist had been killed and then later admitting it.

Turkish officials say the Turkish president and his American counterpart have spoken over the phone and discussed the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel told reporters in Berlin on Sunday that she supports a freeze on arms exports to Saudi Arabia.

Turkey's president says he will announce details of the Turkish investigation into the death of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi's on Tuesday.


The kingdom's announcement comes two days after acknowledging that the Washington Post writer was killed October 2 at the consulate under disputed circumstances.

But doubts remain in the worldwide community over whether the admission really means that the Saudi government is willing to come clean, especially over any involvement by the crown prince.

The report in Yeni Safak citing allegations by Turkish government sources that the Crown Prince personally phoned Khashoggi moments before his murder contradict Saudi claims he had no knowledge of the assassination plot.

Stephen Gethins of the SNP, who organised the letter, said: "What outrages does the Saudi government have to commit before the United Kingdom government says "enough is enough"?"

They said: "Nothing can justify this killing and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms".

Turkish officials contend Khashoggi was killed and dismembered inside the consulate by Saudi operatives hours after he arrived.

For now at least, Spain is not freezing its arms sales to Saudi Arabia.


As for the answers, the driver said they did not sense extraordinary situation on the day when Khashoggi entered the consulate, the testifier was not sent to anywhere out of the consulate, and the working hours began at 9 a.m. (0600GMT) and ended 3.30 p.m. (1230GMT) local time.

Saudi authorities have said Khashoggi died in a fight with Saudi officials at the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul on October 2.

"The world is watching", Kushner said was his advice to Prince Mohammed.

Turkey earlier said 15 Saudis who travelled to Istanbul were involved in Khashoggi's disappearance. Saudi Arabia is Germany's second-largest weapons customer, according to official data reported by German news agency DPA.

Saudi Arabia has provided a shifting account of what happened to Khashoggi. We are determined to find out all the facts.

In its latest version, the government conceded that Khashoggi was killed by mistake in its Istanbul consulate but this only sparked more calls for a complete and transparent investigation, coupled with the threat of sanctions.


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