Kavanaugh confirmation hearings set to start on September 4

Adjust Comment Print

Further, the undisclosed record of his time in the White House might further reveal his judicial philosophy but will go unexamined because Republicans, with Collins' support, are not requesting the documents.

Kavanaugh once helped write the Starr Report, which outlined broad grounds on which to impeach President Clinton for his role in the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Democrats have warned that Kavanaugh may be unwilling to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's ongoing probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings will be held the first week of September, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R., Iowa) announced Friday. He's met with dozens of senators who have nothing but positive things to say.


Kavanaugh will face questions followed by testimony from legal experts and people who know the judge.

Republicans are eager to confirm President Donald Trump's nominee ahead of the new court session October 1, as Justice Anthony Kennedy retires. Democrats have complained Republicans are rushing the process for the lifetime appointment without proper vetting of Kavanaugh's record. "It's time for the American people to hear directly from Judge Kavanaugh at his public hearing", Grassley said in his statement announcing the hearing.

August 2: Former President George W. Bush revealed he is working with William A. Burck - a right-wing political operative who served as a deputy to Kavanaugh in 2005 and is now the attorney representing Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus, and Donald McGahn in the Russian Federation probe - to vet which documents from Kavanaugh's record are released to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


President TrumpDonald John TrumpKobach agrees to recuse himself from vote counting in Kansas GOP primary NFL players kneel during national anthem before first preseason game Schiff blasts GOP for Russian Federation probe conduct: "That's how you obstruct an investigation, not how you conduct one" MORE's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh wrote in a 1995 memo that presidents should be subject to testimony in front of a grand jury the same as any private citizen.

Kavanaugh needs just 50 votes to be confirmed. The committee acknowledged that the Bush screening team decided which records to disclose for public review, a move panned by Democrats.

The Senate panel on Thursday released about 5,700 pages of records on Kavanaugh's work as a White House lawyer during the George W. Bush administration.


"With the Senate already reviewing more documents than for any other Supreme Court nominee in history, Chairman Grassley has lived up to his promise to lead an open, transparent and fair process". Democrats are particularly pushing for access to his three years as staff secretary for Bush, but Republicans are not including those documents in the review.

Comments