Tiger Woods in contention at PGA Championship, but still should be ticked

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Tiger Woods got off to a rocky start at the 2018 PGA Championship at Bellerive in St. Louis, but the 14-time major champion has battled back.

Brooks Koepka had his rivals on the ropes but could not deliver a knockout punch and had his lead whittled to two strokes over Adam Scott after the third round at the PGA Championship on Saturday.

Only a three-putt bogey at the fifth hole halted his progress, though he put the setback quickly behind him to birdie the next three holes.

As of now, just going off the broadcast, it feels more like a mid-level PGA Tour event than the 100th edition of one of golf's most important, tradition and history-rich championships.

"A kid legit just passed out right before Tiger teed off on No. 12", Kyle Porter tweeted.


Both his 66s were compiled in the same fashion, shooting 31 for the front nine and 35 blows for the inward half. Scott is in prime position to honor his buddy by winning his second career major.

A 12-under 198 total still left Koepka within sight of his third major title in 14 months, but the two-times U.S. Open champion's grip on the Wanamaker Trophy had loosened.

Gary Woodland lost his way in his footprints in a bunker and made triple bogey on No. 10, falling six shots behind, and still managed a 71 to stay within three shots of the lead, along with Jon Rahm (66) and Rickie Fowler (69).

To say Brady Brown of Robinson, Illinois came prepared with his attire for this PGA Championship would be an understatement.

If Woods is to win his first tournament anywhere for five years and his first major for double that length, he is going to have to figure out how to improve his scoring on the back nine.


Koepka, who in June became the first man to win back-to-back US Opens since Curtis Strange in 1988-89, could become only the fourth player to win the US Open and PGA Championship in the same year, following fellow Americans Gene Sarazen in 1922, Ben Hogan in 1948 and Jack Nicklaus in 1980. Brooks Koepka and Charl Schwartzel had the best rounds of the field, firing 7-under-par 63s to tie the tournament record for the lowest score in a round.

And it was only good for a one-shot lead over Kevin Kisner.

The former Southern Utah golfer, who is an assistant at Davis Park Golf Course, had shot a 76 in the first round but was much better on Friday.

At four shots back in a six-way tie, there's a cosmopolitan group including Irishman Shane Lowry, Aussie Jason Day, defending champion Justin Thomas - and Tiger. "I drove it really well and gave myself just a lot of chances". Rory McIlroy opened with seven straight pars, and then he belted a drive 359 yards on the par-5 eighth hole when the rain arrived. 'It's just that all the putts I made came on the front nine'. If you do that well, and, obviously, in there you're going to make those putts.


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