Perseid meteor shower: how to see shooting stars this weekend

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"You should be able to see some meteors from July 17 to August 24, with the rates increasing during the weeks before August 12 and decreasing after the 13th", NASA said in a skywatching video. However, this year there will be a New Moon the night before the meteor shower peaks, making an appearance just after sunset as a thin crescent, according to The Weather Network.

The peak nights for this year's shower will be from August 11 to 12 and August 12 to 13, with more than 100 meteors visible per hour, according to Gary Boyle, an Ottawa-based astronomer.

The phenomenon is caused by debris from the tail of the Swift-Tuttle comet entering the Earth's atmosphere and burning up, appearing as bright streaks of light crossing the sky. You can tell if a meteor is a Perseid by following its direction backwards and, if it's coming from the direction of Perseus, it's a Perseid. But for those who want to experience the meteor shower amped up to 11, getting to a "dark sky park" is an absolute must.


Even though this may be somewhat of a down year, the Perseids still typically are one of the best meteor shows of the year.

The shower is expected to peak on the night of Sunday August 12, though Saturday and Monday will also offer excellent views.

They should start whizzing across the sky before midnight, but the best displays will be in the hours before dawn.


During this time, you'll see an incredible number of meteors. He added that it takes at least 30 minutes for human eyes to adjust, so be patient and that you can expect to be outdoors for a few hours. Consequently, viewers are in for an especially bright show.

This means we'll be left with a dark sky for the rest of the night, and only city light pollution will interfere with the show.


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