Hector, still Category 4 hurricane, expected to pass south of islands

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The storm was moving west at roughly 16 miles per hour.

Wind: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaii Island late Tuesday and Wednesday.

The center of Hector will pass about 200 miles south of the Big Island on Wednesday, according to the latest forecast from the Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu.


Surf along the island's east-facing shores is already building and will peak later today and tonight, at 12 to 15 feet for the Big Island mainly in the Puna and Kau districts with 6 to 10 feet surf for eastern Maui. "There is a reasonable chance that Hector will survive to cross the International Date Line early next week", said AccuWeather meteorologist Steve Travis.

The CSU has forecast nine more named storms before the season ends in November, with three expected to become hurricanes and one a major hurricane. Mexican officials discontinued a hurricane watch from Punta San Telmo in Michoacan state to Playa Perula in Jalisco state, though Ileana still could cause heavy surf and rains in that area.

On Monday, Hector's maximum sustained winds peaked at an estimated 155 miles per hour, just shy of Category 5 intensity, making it the strongest central Pacific hurricane since Ioke in 2006, according to Colorado State University tropical scientist Dr. Phil Klotzbach.


The active season in the Pacific contrasts to the relatively quiet season in the Atlantic.

A tropical storm warning has been issued for Hawaii County as Hurricane Hector continues its approach toward Hawaiian waters. Debby poses no threat to land, the hurricane center said.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Hector is also swirling in the Pacific as an impressively organized Category 4 hurricane.


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