Trump arrives in 'hot spot' Britain, questioning May's Brexit plan

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President Donald Trump touched down in Britain on Thursday, where he will get the red carpet treatment on a brief visit: Military bands at a gala dinner, lunch with the prime minister at her country residence, then tea with the queen at Windsor Castle before flying off to one of his golf clubs in Scotland.

In the busy south London neighborhood of Brixton, Victor Greetham, who runs a jazz bar, said he hasn't been to a demonstration since he protested against the Iraq War in 2003, but he planned to attend one of the protests against Trump's visit.

On Friday, May and Trump will hold talks on Brexit, relations with Russian Federation and trade ties at the prime minister's Chequers country residence followed by a press conference.

The six-metre high blimp, dubbed "Trump Baby", has been granted permission to fly above Parliament Square for two hours on Friday morning.

A YouGov poll on Wednesday showed 77 percent of Britons had an unfavorable opinion of Trump and just 50 percent thought his visit should go ahead.


The US embassy's alert to American citizens was an unusual step, CNN reported.

"I'm not for or against him coming, but I hope he doesn't come here and do something negative".

On Friday night, the president will travel to Scotland, Turnberry, the South Ayrshire golf resort he bought in 2014.

Mr Morgan, the forthright journalist and broadcaster, hit back and questioned why the London mayor had not been so vocal over the visit of controversial Turkish President Recep Erdogan.

"I think they like me in the UK".


Just before departing for Europe earlier this week, Trump ruffled feathers again by saying that the United Kingdom was in "turmoil", referring to the resignation of two prominent Cabinet ministers protesting Prime Minister May's Brexit policy.

Last month, Labour member of Parliament Gavin Shuker ran down a list of objections to Trump: the separation of migrant families and detention of children; the US departure from the United Nations' Human Rights Council; the USA president's praise for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Protests are expected against Trump, whose policies - including a travel ban on a number of predominantly Muslim countries, detention of child migrants on the US-Mexico border and imposition of tariffs on European Union steel and aluminium exports - have all been criticised by the UK.

A protest was expected to take place near Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, the venue for President Trump " s black-tie dinner with Theresa May.

"I partially won an election because of immigration", he said, also pointing to Italy's recent vote, in which Giuseppe Conte took government after campaigning on a populist anti-immigration platform.


Their first stop will be the ambassador's official residence in London, Winfield House, which has been surrounded by an ultra-secure ring of steel to keep out protesters.

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