Trump administration threatens tariffs on another $200 billion in Chinese imports

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The Trump administration announced Tuesday that it would impose a 10 percent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese imports, just days after it implemented a 25 percent tariff on $34 billion of Chinese imports. "We believe the U.S. measures interfere with economic globalization and damage the world economic order". Rogers says that, "Before January 2017 all the imports came from China, including Hong Kong".

A survey by the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai found that most USA businesses operating in China oppose the use of tariffs in retaliation for the challenges they face, from an uneven playing field to poor protection of intellectual property rights.

"For over a year, the Trump administration has patiently urged China to stop its unfair practices, open its market, and engage in true market competition", US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in an e-mailed statement.

"China stands in line with the worldwide community on the correct side of history to together protect the rules of the multilateral trade order", foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua said on Wednesday.

"China has no option but to fight fire with fire".


China slammed the US threat to expand tariff hikes to imports including apples, fish sticks and French doors as a "totally unacceptable" escalation of their trade battle on Wednesday and vowed to protect its "core interests". "There is no justification for such action".

The previous round of tariffs: The Trump administration last week imposed 25 percent tariffs on $34 million in Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to impose retaliatory tariffs of the same amount on United States imports.

The National Association of Manufacturers also criticized the USA decision, saying this latest round of tariffs could undermine the economic gains from the administration's tax and regulatory reform policies.

The survey, conducted between April 10 and May 10, reflects the mix of key concerns and realities for American businesses in China at a time of heightened uncertainty as the Trump administration raises the ante in its trade war with Beijing.

'TARIFFS ARE TAXES' Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, a senior member of Trump's Republican Party, said the announcement "appears reckless and is not a targeted approach".


"But more tariffs like these will punish America's manufacturing workers - and could undermine our hard-won gains thanks to tax and regulatory reform". In fact, China is America's second-largest crude oil customer after Canada and is also one of the biggest importers of US propane and liquefied natural gas (LNG). "Consumers, businesses and the American jobs dependent on trade, are left in the crosshairs of an escalating global trade war", said Hun Quach, the head of worldwide trade policy for the group.

Louis Kuijs, Hong Kong-based Head of Asia Economics at Oxford Economics, said China's policy response is likely to be limited for now. Both governments have raised tariffs on US$34 billion worth of each other's goods and already said they are considering additional charges on another US$16 billion.

United States officials issued a list of thousands of Chinese imports the Trump administration wants to hit with the new tariffs, including hundreds of food products as well as tobacco, chemicals, coal, steel and aluminum. But Trump hasn't backed down, arguing that China's unfair trading practices are hurting American workers.

Most US businesses operating in China oppose the use of tariffs in retaliation for the challenges they face, from an uneven playing field to poor protection of intellectual property rights, a survey showed on Thursday.


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