Trump vents anger on North Atlantic Treaty Organisation allies, European Union and Canada's Trudeau

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President Donald Trump's top economic adviser says Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "really kind of stabbed us in the back" when Trudeau said at the end of the Group of Seven summit that Canada wouldn't be pushed around by the USA and its trade tariffs.

Trudeau, who had said at the news conference that Canada would retaliate for new USA tariffs, didn't respond to questions about Trump when the prime minister arrived at a Quebec City hotel Sunday for meetings with other world leaders.

Trudeau had told reporters that Trump's decision to invoke national security to justify USA tariffs on steel and aluminum imports was "kind of insulting" to Canadian veterans who had stood by their United States allies in conflicts dating back to World War I.

While making no direct criticism of Mr Trump, Mrs May acknowledged that the summit had been "difficult" and told MPs she had expressed her "deep disappointment" at the "unjustified" imposition of tariffs on American imports of European steel and aluminium.

"I feel that Kim Jong Un wants to do something great for his people and he has that opportunity", Trump said at a press conference just before he departed a G-7 summit in Charlevoix, Canada, for his historic Tuesday rendezvous with Kim in Singapore.


It came in response to what he claimed were "false statements" by Canadian premier Justin Trudeau.

"I have made it very clear to the President that it is not something we relish doing, but it is something that we absolutely will do".

"As far as this retaliation goes, the American press needs to do a much better job of what the Canadians are getting ready to do because it's nothing short of an attack on our political system and it's nothing short of Canada trying to raise its high protectionist barriers even higher on things like maple syrup and other goods", he said.

Trump, after announcing the tariffs, sends message to Trudeau about NAFTA talks on May 31 - "Earlier today, this message was conveyed to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada: The United State (sic) will agree to a fair deal, or there will be no deal at all".

Trade adviser Peter Navarro told "Fox News Sunday" that "there is a special place in hell for any leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy" with Trump.


Justin Trudeau and President Trump participate in the working session at the G7 summit on Friday.

Trudeau has vehemently opposed the imposition of tariff on United States import of Canadian steel and aluminium and has threatened with retaliatory measures.

In the wake of Trump and his aides' comments, many domestic and foreign leaders came to Trudeau's defense.

At the summit, Trump played a wild card, suggesting that rather than both sides boosting retaliatory tariffs - as he has just done on steel and aluminum - they could declare for entirely free trade in the G7 zone.

Reneging on the commitments agreed in the communique showed "incoherence and inconsistency", it said in a statement.


"In a matter of seconds, you can destroy trust with 280 Twitter characters", German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said when asked about Trump's U-turn. These countermeasures amount up to 16.6 billion Canadian dollars (about 12 billion USA dollars) in imports of steel, aluminum, and other products from the Unites States, and are set to come into effect on July 1 this year. "But it did not start with this G7, but with the election of Donald Trump", said a European official.

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