Donald Trump reignites Opec spat over 'too high' oil prices

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Brent crude LCOc1 was up 87 cents, or over 1 percent, at $76.75 a barrel by 1:38 p.m. EDT (1938 GMT).

President Trump complained Wednesday that oil prices are too high and blamed the spike on OPEC, the group of 14 nations that controls a major portion of the world's supply of crude petroleum. Crude inventories fell by 4.1 million barrels in the week to June 8, exceeding analysts' expectations for a decrease of 2.7 million barrels.

United States President Donald Trump on Wednesday accused the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) of driving up oil prices, in a fresh swipe at the cartel's agreement to cap production.

"To make up for the losses, we estimate that Middle East OPEC countries could increase production in fairly short order by about 1.1 mb/d and there could be more output from Russian Federation on top of the increase already built into our 2019 non-OPEC supply numbers", it added.


IEA's scenario showed that by the end of next year output from these two countries could be 1.5 million bpd lower than now, amid U.S. sanctions against Iran and the production collapse in Venezuela.

The benchmark price of crude has surged from around $50 a barrel last summer to within a breath of $80 a barrel a few weeks ago.

Longer term, the market could tighten as demand increases if OPEC fails to cover supply shortfalls, the International Energy Agency said on Wednesday.

Yet, even with the 1.8 million-bpd production rollback, the total OPEC/non-OPEC level would still be around 1 million bpd below the October 2016 levels, because some producers, notably Saudi Arabia, have cut more than intended, while others, most notably Venezuela, have seen involuntary production declines and are unable to lift production, the person told Bloomberg.


"Prices are unlikely to increase as sharply as they did from mid-2017 onwards and thus the dampening effect on demand will be reduced", the IEA said in its latest monthly report.

For 2019, IEA's estimate of demand anticipates growth of 1.4 million barrels of oil per day, amid a boost from the petrochemicals sector, where some projects are coming on stream earlier than previously thought.

Fund manager Pierre Andurand at Andurand Capital was bullish.

"Oil prices are too high, OPEC is at it again".


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