Lawsuits threaten to derail Musk's Los Angeles tunnel

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With The Boring Company's new 2.7-mile tunnel in Los Angeles nearing completion soon, as the Inquisitr recently reported, talk has now turned to Elon Musk's recent tweet which appears to suggest that Musk may be seriously considering integrating The Boring Company with SpaceX for astonishingly fast transportation to any point around the globe in under 60 minutes.

The charismatic entrepreneur said he hoped the new public transport system would help resolve the city's chaotic traffic. The Loop would be composed of all electric pods transporting 16 passengers at a time to and from parking-spot sized stations. "It's the first step toward a 60-mile tunnel network across the city". Opponents say the exemption Boring seeks from a lengthy environmental review of the Los Angeles test tunnel violates state law forbidding such waivers for large-scope projects on a piecemeal basis.

Earlier, Musk hinted that he plans to link the hyperloop project under his start-up The Boring Company with SpaceX's rockets to create a transportation system that may ferry people anywhere on Earth in less than an hour.


The billionaire businessman Elon Musk told a cheering crowd that his dream of burrowing a high-speed network of "personalised mass transit" tunnels under Los Angeles could be achieved without disturbance or noise.

It would turn a almost 15-hour flight from Shanghai to NY on a conventional airliner into just a 39-minute trip.

Musk launched his foray into public transit after complaining about traffic on Twitter in late 2016, vowing to "build a boring machine and just start digging". A trip from download LA to the airport would take just 8 minutes, he promised.


A slightly shorter test tunnel is already largely finished underneath the tiny neighboring municipality of Hawthorne, where Boring and SpaceX are both headquartered.

The extension runs 13.5 metres (44 feet) under public roads around the SpaceX headquarters, and is the first time the Boring Company has been allowed to dig outside of its property line.

The plan calls for excavated soil to be compacted into concrete reinforcement segments for the tunnels, or turned into construction bricks.


The company assured citizens that if the top soil moves by as little as half an inch (one cm), work will stop immediately.

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