Boy finds treasure linked to Viking king 'Harald Bluetooth' on Baltic island

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A 13-year-old boy and an amateur archaeologist have helped to uncover a unique stash of lost treasure thought to be associated with the legendary Danish King "Harry Bluetooth", who brought Christianity to Denmark in the 10th century.

They had been using metal detectors to hunt for treasure.

But upon closer inspection, they realized that it was a shimmering piece of silver, German media reported.

Archaeologists from the State Office then got involved and planned a dig to uncover the complete treasure.


But experts kept the find secret until last week.

Malaschnitschenko and Schoen were invited to participate in the recovery.

On the East German island of rügen in the Baltic sea were found hundreds of silver coins, rings, pearls and bracelets.

Schön's find was not entirely down to luck, perhaps, as in the 1870s, pieces of gold jewelry believed to be linked to Bluetooth were found on the island of Hiddensee, which is next to Rügen. According to the Guardian, the oldest of the coins comes from the year 714, while the most recent one dates back to the year 983.


Towards the end of his life, Bluetooth's son Sweyn Forkbeard rebelled against his father and took the throne, while Bluetooth fled to Pomerania - northeast Germany on the Baltic sea - where he died a year or so later.

"We have here a rare case, when a discovery seems to be related to historical sources", says the chief archaeologist of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Detlef Jantzen.

His nickname came from the fact he had a dead tooth that looked bluish, but it's now best known for the wireless Bluetooth technology invented by Swedish telecom company Ericsson.

The technology, developed to wirelessly link computers with cellular devices, was named after Bluetooth because of his knack for unification. The symbol of Bluetooth is also a mixture of two letters of runic alphabets representing the initials of King Harald.


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