Russian Federation probe: House intel Republicans end investigation despite Dem protests

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Members of Congress, Trump's fellow Republicans as well as Democrats, have been pushing the administration to punish Russian Federation for what House Speaker Paul Ryan described as a "sinister and systematic attack" on the 2016 US campaign, and prevent potential foreign interference in this November's mid-term elections.

Rep. Mike Conaway, the Texas Republican leading the Russian Federation investigation, said Monday that the committee had concluded its interviews for the Russian Federation investigation, and the Republican staff had prepared a 150-page draft report that they would give to Democrats to review on Tuesday morning.

Democrats say there are still scores of witnesses the committee should call, and argue that Republicans have failed to use subpoenas to obtain documents and require witnesses to answer questions that are central to the investigation. Once the draft report is adopted by committee Democrats, the report will be submitted to the intelligence community for a declassification review, and following that process, will be released to the public, officials said, though the timeline at this point is unknown.

"At the outset of the Russian Federation probe, both parties committed to a thorough investigation that would follow the facts wherever they lead", Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the committee's senior Democrat and a former federal prosecutor, said in a recent statement.

"We disagree with the Intelligence Community's position that Putin favored Trump", Conaway told Fox News Monday.

Even while he had stepped aside, Nunes upset Democrats by continuing to issue subpoenas for documents and witnesses.

Conaway also said that he did not "anticipate" pursuing contempt proceedings against former Trump campaign manager Steve Bannon or any other witnesses who did not respond favorably to the committee's questioning.

Instead, Schiff said, Republicans declined to subpoena witnesses to compel them to answer key questions after witnesses refused to do so during their voluntary, closed-door appearances before the committee.

"There are a number of steps that I think any credible investigator would say, 'These need to be done, ' and we still hope that they will be", Schiff said following Lewandowski's interview last week.

The committee's traditional bipartisanship began unraveling in the spring of past year, when Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., took a secret trip to White House grounds to review information gathered by unnamed sources purporting to show that President Trump was under surveillance by the Obama administration during the 2016 campaign.

There are still two committees in the Senate that are investigating Russia's 2016 election meddling: the Senate Intelligence and Judiciary Committees.

The House Intelligence Committee has finished all of its interviews in its congressional Russian Federation investigation.