Judge rules $560M Powerball jackpot victor can remain anonymous

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Cashiers Kathy Robinson, left, and Ethel Kroska, right, both of Merrimack, N.H., sell a lottery ticket at Reeds Ferry Market convenience store in Merrimack on January 7, 2018.

The victor sued the New Hampshire Lottery last month under the name of Jane Doe, in a bid to collect the winnings through a trust to protect her anonymity.

An essential decision ahead, Mr Shaheen said, will be for the victor to determine whether to spend the money while she is alive or to create a more enduring fund, like a foundation or endowment.

A judge ruled Monday that a New Hampshire woman who won a Powerball jackpot worth almost $560 million can keep her identity private, but not her hometown.

The New Hampshire Lottery Commission says it respects a judge's decision to let a woman who won a Powerball jackpot worth almost $560 million keep her identity private.


The judge ruled the New Hampshire Lottery Commission can not release the woman's name or address. He ruled, however, that her hometown can be released publicly.

Doe put her name and address on the winning ticket for the Jan 6. draw, but before she sent it to the New Hampshire Lottery Commission, she turned to attorneys to see if she could remain anonymous.

The woman's lawyers argued her privacy interests outweigh what the state said is the public's right to know who won the money in the nation's eighth-largest lottery jackpot.

"She will be able to live her life normally", he added.

In her lawsuit, she said that disclosing her identity "would constitute a significant invasion of her privacy", and that previous winners have been "victims of violence, threats, harassment, scams and constant unwanted solicitation".


Attorneys for Doe last week collected the winnings on behalf of her Good Karma Family 2018 Nominee Trust.

Charlie McIntyre, the lottery commission's executive director, said in a statement: "While we were expecting a different outcome and believed the state had a strong argument, we respect the court's decision".

She had already received her after-tax winnings of US$264 million while the judge mulled her claim to privacy. The state Attorney General's Office said the woman's name must be revealed because she signed the back of the ticket, USA Today reported.

Abraham Shakespeare, the victor of a $30 million lottery prize in 2006, was approached two years later by a woman who said she was writing a book about how people were taking advantage of him, became his financial adviser and slowly siphoned away his money.


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