Myanmar army admits it killed Rohingyas

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More than 600,000 Rohingya, who are not recognised by the Myanmar government as one of the country's many ethnic groups, have fled to Bangladesh since August previous year, when violence between armed Rohingya and Myanmar security forces prompted a severe crackdown.

It was a rare acknowledgment of wrongdoing by the Myanmar military during its operations in the western state of Rakhine.

On Wednesday, the military acknowledged that security forces and villagers were responsible for the deaths of 10 people found in a mass grave in December.

"These 10 Rohingya innocent civilians found in the mass grave. were neither ARSA members nor had any association with ARSA", it said in a statement circulated on Twitter.


"A Myanmar government spokesman said in response to ARSA's statement that sometimes "terrorists and villagers were allied" in attacks" against security forces. "There will be an ongoing investigating process whether they are members of ARSA or not".

As per Anadolu news agency, the request comes after the military admitted to the killing of 10 Rohingyas in the war-ravaged Rakhine state.

Japanese's foreign minister on Friday urged Myanmar's civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi to guarantee the safe and voluntary return of Rohingya Muslims who have fled violence in troubled Rakhine state.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi shakes hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono after their a joint press conference at the Foreign Ministry in Nay Pyi Taw on Friday.


Neither the military nor Suu Kyi has said what action will be taken against those responsible for the deaths linked to the mass grave in Rakhine state. The army appointed a senior officer to investigate. "This incident happened because ethnic Buddhist villagers were threatened and provoked by the terrorists". Lawyer Khin Win said a murder complaint against the son was filed with local prosecutors last week in Maungdaw, the nearest town to Inn Din. The other three had been released, he said.

More than 655,000 Rohingyas have crossed into Bangladesh since August 25 past year, escaping a military crackdown in the Rakhine state, which many countries and human rights bodies have described as ethnic cleansing.

The UN and U.S. have accused Myanmar's army of ethnic cleansing, with the UN rights chief saying it may even be guilty of genocide.


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