Mystery surrounds fate of secret satellite slung by SpaceX

Adjust Comment Print

This was SpaceX' s third classified mission for the USA government, a lucrative customer.

SpaceX on Sunday blasted off a secretive U.S. government payload known as Zuma, a mission whose nature - and the agency behind it - remains a mystery.

What makes things tricky is the fact that the satellite failed to achieve orbit, reportedly burning up in the earth's atmosphere.

Musk has said it is possible that the Falcon Heavy's first launch could end with the rocket blowing up, so he's placing his personal property - his Tesla Roadster - in the nosecone as payload.


"... the main goal of tonight's flight was getting Zuma aloft, so the spacecraft can start going about its business".

However, these rumors about mission failure were recently cleared out by Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX President who negated the reports stating that the classified Zuma satellite was successfully planted in the Earth's lower orbit after its launch.

SpaceX spokesman James Gleeson said: "We do not comment on missions of this nature; but as of right now reviews of the data indicate Falcon 9 performed nominally". If we or others find otherwise based on further review, we will report it immediately.

SpaceX launched two other national security missions past year: a satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office in May and the Pentagon's autonomous space plane, known as the X-37B, in September. Last year, SpaceX completed 18 launches.


Elon Musk has announced that the first flight of his company's "Falcon Heavy" rocket will carry a Tesla Roadster - touted as the quickest vehicle in the world with record-setting acceleration, range and performance - into Martian orbit.

SpaceX has launched national security payloads in the past, including a spy satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office, and an X-37B space plane for the US Air Force.

Just before 1 p.m., though, the company postponed the test fire.


Comments