The DPRK launched a ballistic missile fell into sea of Japan

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When the North launched an intercontinental ballistic missile late last month, pilots from two Korean Air passenger planes said they spotted the engine blasts and reported the sighting to the Japanese aviation authorities.

The representative of the Ministry of defense Colonel Robert manning reported that the missile flew about 1,000 km before falling into the sea of Japan, reports Reuters.

Despite catching glimpses of the weapon-thought to be the deadliest missile in North Korea's arsenal-Cathay Pacific and Korean Air had not chosen to alter their routes as of Tuesday, according to a Bloomberg report. While North Korea has claimed that their new weapon has put all parts of the United States within reach of a devastating strike, US officials say the latest test was a failure since the missile broke apart on re-entry as the airliner witnessed.

"The most likely reason is simple that they did it for aesthetics".


Singapore Airlines (SINGF) said its flights don't travel "in the vicinity of the missile trajectory" because of the route change it made to avoid the northern part of the sea between the Korean peninsula and Japan.

The crew of the Cathay Pacific Airways flight says they witnessed the rogue nation's latest weapon break apart and explode as it traveled through the sky early Wednesday morning on November 29.

Cathay said there was no current plan to change air routes, saying its plane was "far from the event location". "We remain alert and (will) review the situation as it evolves".

North Korea and its missile tests have become one of the most talked about issues globally.


According to the Committee of chiefs of staffs of armed forces of South Korea, the missile launched from the landfill in the North Korean city of Pinson in the province's toll.

Despite North Korea being obliged to give prior notice of any activity that could potentially threaten the safety of civilian aircraft as a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it repeatedly conducted missile tests without warning.

Travelers who are concerned should know the chances of an airplane colliding with a missile are extremely low: One safety analyst estimates that it is less than a billion to one.


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