The Boring Company illustrates its plans for LA tunnels

Adjust Comment Print

One of the companies started by Elon Musk, The Boring Company, has released plans for an extensive tunnel system under Los Angeles that would eventually house a new transportation system.

For more information visit The Boring Company website.


Taking to Twitter, the entrepreneur said The Boring Company will compete to fund, build, and operate a high-speed Loop from Chicago O'Hare. The Boring Company suggests in the permit applications filed last month with the Bureau of Engineering that its system would be better because separate tunnels would be constructed for each stop (kind of like a freeway off-ramp), allowing vehicles to move close to top speed until they arrive at their final destination.

Phase 1 of the project would be constructed as a "proof-of-concept" tunnel and would be used for construction logistics verification, system testing, safety testing, operating procedure verification and line-switching demonstrations. In May, Musk offered a glimpse of what that might look like. With a proof-of-concept tube already underway, The Boring Company has now expanded on its plans for the City of Angels, offering an idea of how a network of high-speed tunnels could take shape. The first would create a single 6.5-mile tunnel parallel to the 405 freeway.


These tunnels would essentially function as fast freeways, where vehicles and passenger pods latch onto electric skates and get shuttled along at up to 150 miles per hour (241 km/h). However, the company makes it clear that Phase 2 is presented "as a concept" and "not as a finalized alignment".

Phase 2 is marked in Blue, showing the full extend of the Boring company's ambitions, from Sherman Oaks in the north to Long Beach Airport in the south, from Dodger Stadium in the east all the way to the coast in the West. The company says it would develop these tunnels in collaboration with the authorities and will be seeking input from the general public on station locations and other system improvements.


Comments