Saudi-led coalition intensifies Yemen air strikes after Saleh's death

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The Arab League's general secretariat condemned the Iran-aligned Houthi movement which killed Saleh as a "terrorist organisation" and demanded that the worldwide community view it as such.

Iran's semi-official ISNA news agency quoted Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari on Tuesday as saying that Saudi Arabia, "on behalf of the US and the Zionist regime (Israel), has a very important role in creating insecurity" in the Middle East.

Saleh's forces were key to helping the Houthis overrun Sanaa in 2014, and then much of the north and center of the country.

Around 20 women, dressed head to toe in black, did not hide their loyalty to the leader of three decades, who was killed by the Iran-backed rebels on Monday after their uneasy alliance collapsed.

Although the conflict began as a civil war between Shiite Houthis and the government of Saudi-backed former President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, it has morphed into a proxy battle between Saudi Arabia and Iran, which has lent support to the Houthis.


A video circulating online on Monday showed Saleh's body with a gaping head wound dumped in a pickup truck by rebels — a grisly end recalling that of longtime strongman Saleh's contemporary, Libya's Moammar Gadhafi, in 2011.

A military source said the Huthis stopped their four-car convoy about 40 kilometres south of Sanaa and shot dead Saleh and two other senior GPC officials.

The Saudi-led military coalition fighting the armed Houthi movement in Yemen's civil war started a blockade of ports a month ago after Saudi Arabia intercepted a missile fired toward its capital Riyadh from Yemen.

The analyst also warned that if Arabs do not unite, it will not be odd to soon witness the effects of Iranian intervention, such as the emerging of sectarian conflicts, ethnic wars, and total destruction in other Arab countries.

Saleh's oldest son meanwhile pledged in a declaration sent to Reuters to fight the Houthis and liberate all territory held by the rebels.


The war and blockade has plunged Yemen into a major humanitarian disaster, leaving 20 million people in need of aid.

Saleh's slaying likely gives the rebels the upper hand in the dayslong fighting for the country's capital, Sanaa.

However, in late November, the tensions between the former allies escalated and resulted in clashes that have already claimed lives of hundreds of people, including the ex-president himself.

But over the past year, the Houthis appear to have undermined Saleh, wooing away some of his commanders.

According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) on Tuesday, more than 230 people have been killed and around 400 injured in the Yemen war since the beginning of this month.


Worldwide aid groups warned today they were losing the ability to reach civilians in Sanaa. It is reported that only five people attended the funeral.

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