President Trump: We can not aid Puerto Rico 'forever'

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Puerto Rico has been reeling since Hurricane Maria struck three weeks ago, leaving death and destruction in an unparalleled humanitarian crisis.

Almost three weeks after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico, the vast majority of the island remains without power and the death toll from the storm has risen to 45, authorities said. He blamed Puerto Rico for its looming financial crisis and "a total lack of accountability".

The mayor tweeted that Trump is "incapable of fulfilling the moral imperative to help the people of PR. Shame on you!" "We can not keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been awesome (under the most hard circumstances) in P.R. forever!"


She called his comments "unbecoming" of a commander-in-chief and said they seem "more to come from a 'Hater in Chief'".

Trump sparked a firestorm Thursday morning by suggesting on Twitter that Puerto Rico's struggles are largely the fault of island officials for fiscal mismanagement and crumbling infrastructure.

President Donald Trump is criticizing hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico and says the government can't keep federal aid there "forever". Puerto Rico's sole representative in Congress, Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon, and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers also will be part of the congressional delegation.


The recovery has moved slowly since Maria struck the United States territory on September 20, leaving most of the island without basic services such as power and running water, according to residents, relief workers and local elected officials.

Attkisson is a conservative journalist who has repeatedly defended Trump. It has killed at least 45 people, and about 85 percent of Puerto Rico residents still lack electricity. Hospitals throughout the cash-strapped island of 3.4 million people have been running low on medicine and fuel, and residents and local elected officials have said they expect the death toll to rise. The recovery effort comes after the government-owned electricity utility PREPA filed for bankruptcy in July - and after Puerto Rico itself filed for bankruptcy, facing more than $120 billion in debt, as NPR's Samnatha Raphelson has reported. As Tom Gjelten reported last night, the island has 78 mayors - and, he added, "They're said to be accustomed to doing their business without interference from above". But the federal relief effort has also hit problems such as reported hoarding by municipal employees, Tom said, citing it as one reason for the "militarization of the aid operation" in Puerto Rico.

It was not immediately clear which Superfund sites the EPA was referring to.


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