Iran FM briefs parliament on Trump's threat to nuclear deal

Adjust Comment Print

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster and several of President Trump's other senior advisers have spent the last several months coming up with a plan that takes into account Trump's anger over the Iran nuclear deal without completely killing the agreement, seven people with knowledge of the situation told The Washington Post.

The state-run IRNA news agency reported that the country's top diplomat, Mohammad Javad Zarif, briefed lawmakers during a closed session of parliament on Trump's anticipated refusal to certify Iran's nuclear deal with world powers.

Engel said at the hearing that killing the deal would be a "grave mistake", since it is in place and backed by US allies and other powers.

Former Obama administration officials who played central roles in brokering the Iran nuclear agreement are scheduled to brief congressional Democrats later Wednesday on the merits of the worldwide accord.


Johnson said the agreement - under which Iran agreed to limit its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions - "was the culmination of 13 years of painstaking diplomacy and has increased security, both in the region and in the UK".

In a rare case of the United Kingdom publicly pressuring the US, the British government said Wednesday that Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson had called Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to underscore British support for the deal.

"What Trump is doing is opening a very unnecessary "Pandora's box" of troubles at a time when he is unable to competently handle the crisis with North Korea's nuclear program", said Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association, which supports the Iran deal.

On the other hand, some argue decertification and the possibility of US sanctions on Iran might win support from the Europeans.


"This is the worst deal".

"We will see what happens pretty soon", said Trump, who must announce his decision on whether to certify Iran's compliance by the end of the week.

Deutch said the danger of walking away from the agreement is that those expiration dates "would have effectively dropped from a decade to a day" because Iran would be freed of its obligations under the deal. He still has concerns with how the accord will contain Iran in the future, but he doesn't want the pact ditched. "We thought it was the wrong decision", Cardin told reporters recently.


Comments